Sat. Apr 20th, 2024

Pt “What strategies have you/your partner used during disagreements with each other in the last year” ranged from Never (0) to Often (3)). The analyses presented below include maternal conflict resolution strategies. Thus, ratings of maternal conflict resolution strategies were self-report for most families given that the majority of Leupeptin (hemisulfate) chemical information participating parents were mothers. When the participating parent was the father, they rated the conflict resolution strategies of their partner (i.e., the father’s report of maternal conflict resolution strategies). We included data from families in which the father was the participating parent, so as to include as much information H 4065 manufacturer related to maternal conflict resolution strategies as possible. Of the families participating in the study, 206 mothers and 46 fathers completed the CPS. The CPS has demonstrated reliability and validity. In the current study, the CPS’s verbal aggression, physical aggression, stonewalling, and triangulation subscales, all showed high reliability for mothers and fathers with alphas ranging from .72 to .96. In previous research, CPS scores were correlated with scores on the Conflicts Tactics Scales (Kerig, 1996), with children’s ratings of related dimensions on the Children’s Perceptions of Interparental Conflict measure, and related to children’s psychological adjustment. Previous research showed that for divorced parents, triangulation mediates the relation between post-divorce conflict and daughters’ relational aggression (Kerig et al., 2001). Mothers’ ratings of partners’ conflict strategies have been shown to be correlated with self-reports (Kerig, 1996; Marcus et al., 2001). To examine if fathers were accurate reporters of maternal conflict resolution strategies, correlation analyses were conducted for the small subgroup in this study for which both parents completed this measure (n = 31), fathers’ reports of mothers’ strategies and mothers’ self-reports were positively correlated (for stonewalling, r(29) = .64, p < .001 and for triangulation, r(29) = .72, p <. 001; see Underwood et al., 2008).NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptAggress Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 September 01.Ehrenreich et al.PageParenting styles and dimensions (PSD)--The participating parent completed the Parenting Styles and Dimensions questionnaire (PSD; Robinson Mandleco, 1995), a 50item questionnaire designed to measure authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting (Baumrind, 1971). Parents rated both themselves and their spouses on a scale from Never (1) to Always (5) on how often they engage in particular parenting behaviors. Factor analyses demonstrated that items clustered onto three factors corresponding to Baumrind's parenting styles (Robinson Mandleco, 1995). Sample items from the PSD include "I guide our child more through punishment than by reasoning" (authoritarian) and "I let our child do anything he/she wants to do" (permissive parenting). In a study with low-income African American parents of preschool children, construct validity of the subscales relating to authoritative and authoritarian parenting was demonstrated by factor analyses (Coolahan, McWayne, Fantuzzo, Grim, 2002). Concurrent validity of the two subscales was demonstrated by convergent and divergent associations with observations of parent-child relationships. Some dimensions of these subscales have been shown to relate to relational and physical aggres.Pt "What strategies have you/your partner used during disagreements with each other in the last year" ranged from Never (0) to Often (3)). The analyses presented below include maternal conflict resolution strategies. Thus, ratings of maternal conflict resolution strategies were self-report for most families given that the majority of participating parents were mothers. When the participating parent was the father, they rated the conflict resolution strategies of their partner (i.e., the father's report of maternal conflict resolution strategies). We included data from families in which the father was the participating parent, so as to include as much information related to maternal conflict resolution strategies as possible. Of the families participating in the study, 206 mothers and 46 fathers completed the CPS. The CPS has demonstrated reliability and validity. In the current study, the CPS's verbal aggression, physical aggression, stonewalling, and triangulation subscales, all showed high reliability for mothers and fathers with alphas ranging from .72 to .96. In previous research, CPS scores were correlated with scores on the Conflicts Tactics Scales (Kerig, 1996), with children's ratings of related dimensions on the Children's Perceptions of Interparental Conflict measure, and related to children's psychological adjustment. Previous research showed that for divorced parents, triangulation mediates the relation between post-divorce conflict and daughters' relational aggression (Kerig et al., 2001). Mothers' ratings of partners' conflict strategies have been shown to be correlated with self-reports (Kerig, 1996; Marcus et al., 2001). To examine if fathers were accurate reporters of maternal conflict resolution strategies, correlation analyses were conducted for the small subgroup in this study for which both parents completed this measure (n = 31), fathers' reports of mothers' strategies and mothers' self-reports were positively correlated (for stonewalling, r(29) = .64, p < .001 and for triangulation, r(29) = .72, p <. 001; see Underwood et al., 2008).NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author Manuscript NIH-PA Author ManuscriptAggress Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 September 01.Ehrenreich et al.PageParenting styles and dimensions (PSD)--The participating parent completed the Parenting Styles and Dimensions questionnaire (PSD; Robinson Mandleco, 1995), a 50item questionnaire designed to measure authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting (Baumrind, 1971). Parents rated both themselves and their spouses on a scale from Never (1) to Always (5) on how often they engage in particular parenting behaviors. Factor analyses demonstrated that items clustered onto three factors corresponding to Baumrind's parenting styles (Robinson Mandleco, 1995). Sample items from the PSD include "I guide our child more through punishment than by reasoning" (authoritarian) and "I let our child do anything he/she wants to do" (permissive parenting). In a study with low-income African American parents of preschool children, construct validity of the subscales relating to authoritative and authoritarian parenting was demonstrated by factor analyses (Coolahan, McWayne, Fantuzzo, Grim, 2002). Concurrent validity of the two subscales was demonstrated by convergent and divergent associations with observations of parent-child relationships. Some dimensions of these subscales have been shown to relate to relational and physical aggres.