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Hniques to determine the knowledge of tobacco and its health effects and assess their support for smoke-free policies among community pharmacists. The outcome of this research may be used as evidence-based information for involving community pharmacists in advocating for promotion of smoke-free policies and encourage a smoke-free environment in Nigeria. METHODS Lagos state is the commercial capital of Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa. The Pharmacists Council of Nigeria (PCN) is the governing body that licences pharmacists in Nigeria and there were 634 licensed retailing premises registered with the PCN in Lagos state at the time of the study. This crosssectional descriptive study using qualitative and quantitative techniques was carried out among registered community pharmacists operating in retail pharmaceutical premises within the state. The minimum sample size was calculated for the study using the formula for descriptive studies and based 22 on the WP1066 chemical information relevant findings of a previous study. Considering a confidence level of 95 , an alpha of 0.05 and a precision of 5 and an expected nonresponse rate of 20 , the final sample size for the study was 212. A list of the 634 licensed retailing pharmaceutical premises in Lagos state stratified by local government areas was obtained from the Lagos state branch office of the Pharmacists Council of Nigeria. Local government areas were randomly and sequentially selected from this list and all eligible pharmaceutical premises were visited and included in the study after obtaining informed consents. Only one eligible and consenting pharmacist in each pharmaceutical premise in the selected local government areas was randomly selected and included in the study. This process was continued till the sample size was attained. In total, nine local government areas were used for the study. Eligible pharmacists had to be licensed with the Pharmacists Council of Nigeria with at least six months working experience. Interns were excluded from the study. A cross-sectional descriptive study design was employed using both quantitative and qualitative techniques. Quantitative data was collected using self-administered questionnaires given to the selected pharmacists in each pharmacy outlet. The questionnaires were developed by the authors based on a review of existing literature and a local knowledge of pharmacy practice in Nigeria. The questionnaire was pre-tested and appropriate corrections made thereafter. Reliability testing showed a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.823. The questionnaire elicited information on respondents’ socio demographic details, characteristics of the pharmaceutical premise, smoking status, knowledge of tobacco and its health related risks and attitudes towards smokers and smoke-free bans. Each questionnaire took approximately 20 minutes to complete. Quantitative data purchase RO5186582 collection was carried out over a period of five weeks (between the first week of September and thewww.pharmacypractice.org (ISSN: 1886-3655)Poluyi EO, Odukoya OO, Aina BA Faseru B. Tobacco related knowledge and support for smoke-free policies among community pharmacists in Lagos state, Nigeria. Pharmacy Practice 2015 Jan-Mar;13(1):486. Table 1. Question guide for the focus group discussion What is tobacco? What are the forms of tobacco that you know of? What are the health risks associated with tobacco use? What are the health risks associated with second hand smoke exposure? What is your opinion about banning tobacco smok.Hniques to determine the knowledge of tobacco and its health effects and assess their support for smoke-free policies among community pharmacists. The outcome of this research may be used as evidence-based information for involving community pharmacists in advocating for promotion of smoke-free policies and encourage a smoke-free environment in Nigeria. METHODS Lagos state is the commercial capital of Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa. The Pharmacists Council of Nigeria (PCN) is the governing body that licences pharmacists in Nigeria and there were 634 licensed retailing premises registered with the PCN in Lagos state at the time of the study. This crosssectional descriptive study using qualitative and quantitative techniques was carried out among registered community pharmacists operating in retail pharmaceutical premises within the state. The minimum sample size was calculated for the study using the formula for descriptive studies and based 22 on the relevant findings of a previous study. Considering a confidence level of 95 , an alpha of 0.05 and a precision of 5 and an expected nonresponse rate of 20 , the final sample size for the study was 212. A list of the 634 licensed retailing pharmaceutical premises in Lagos state stratified by local government areas was obtained from the Lagos state branch office of the Pharmacists Council of Nigeria. Local government areas were randomly and sequentially selected from this list and all eligible pharmaceutical premises were visited and included in the study after obtaining informed consents. Only one eligible and consenting pharmacist in each pharmaceutical premise in the selected local government areas was randomly selected and included in the study. This process was continued till the sample size was attained. In total, nine local government areas were used for the study. Eligible pharmacists had to be licensed with the Pharmacists Council of Nigeria with at least six months working experience. Interns were excluded from the study. A cross-sectional descriptive study design was employed using both quantitative and qualitative techniques. Quantitative data was collected using self-administered questionnaires given to the selected pharmacists in each pharmacy outlet. The questionnaires were developed by the authors based on a review of existing literature and a local knowledge of pharmacy practice in Nigeria. The questionnaire was pre-tested and appropriate corrections made thereafter. Reliability testing showed a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.823. The questionnaire elicited information on respondents’ socio demographic details, characteristics of the pharmaceutical premise, smoking status, knowledge of tobacco and its health related risks and attitudes towards smokers and smoke-free bans. Each questionnaire took approximately 20 minutes to complete. Quantitative data collection was carried out over a period of five weeks (between the first week of September and thewww.pharmacypractice.org (ISSN: 1886-3655)Poluyi EO, Odukoya OO, Aina BA Faseru B. Tobacco related knowledge and support for smoke-free policies among community pharmacists in Lagos state, Nigeria. Pharmacy Practice 2015 Jan-Mar;13(1):486. Table 1. Question guide for the focus group discussion What is tobacco? What are the forms of tobacco that you know of? What are the health risks associated with tobacco use? What are the health risks associated with second hand smoke exposure? What is your opinion about banning tobacco smok.