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UscriptIn conclusion, HLA matching except when there is zero HLA-A, -B, and -DR incompatibility has had even less influence on short or long term primary cadaver kidney survival in African-Americans than the minimal effect in the non-African-American population.
J HEALTH POPUL NUTR 2008 Sep;26(3):251-252 ISSN 1606-0997 | 5.00+0.�INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR DIARRHOEAL DISEASE RESEARCH, BANGLADESHEDITORIALAchieving the CPI-455 biological activity Millennium Development Goals in BangladeshIn early 2006, HS-173MedChemExpress HS-173 scientists at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) proposed to the Office of the Population, Health, and Nutrition at the USAID Mission in Dhaka a review of some major health issues of Bangladesh–at least those in which ICDDR,B has expertise. The aim of this review was to identify selected key issues, try to understand the trends over the last one to two decade(s), and to interpret these trends in the light of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It was hoped these trends would show that Bangladesh was on target to meet these goals, or if it was not on a successful track, to suggest reasonable strategies to improve the trends. Obviously, there are many important health issues outside the scope of the ICDDR,B’s expertise, e.g. diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and many others. These are critical issues for the country, but these have not been identified as MDG targets, nor are these within the expertise of ICDDR,B; these are not, thus, included in this volume, although these may be extremely important for the overall provision of healthcare in the country. ICDDR,B is organized into thematic programmes as shown in the box. The members of each programme have discussed the challenge of identifying the key issues in their thematic area and have provided the information for each of the papers in this report. Some papers submitted to me were too detailed and had to be condensed to reduce their size. However, I have attempted to include the essence of the thinking of the groups. In each case, a writing team has contributed to the paper, and a smaller group has actually drafted the version submitted.Correspondence and reprint requests should be addressed to: Dr. David A. Sack Professor, Department of International Health Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 615NorthWolfeStreet/E5036 Baltimore, Maryland 21205 USA Email:[email protected] Fax:1-410-502-For each of the identified issues, there were two cross-cutting and inter-related themes in the background of the discussion. These may not always be stated explicitly in the text, but these clearly form an underlying concept for all our research and evaluation at the Centre. These are issues of equity and gender. It is not fair that basic health services would be available to some groups and not others. It is not fair that girls have higher degrees of malnutrition than boys, that women receive treatment for serious chronic conditions later than men, or that women proceed through pregnancy and delivery without the services needed to protect their health and their life. These equity and gender concerns partly relate to society and cultural practices, but they also relate to the health system itself. Regardless of the source of the inequity or bias, the health system must understand them and adjust to meet the needs of the vulnerable groups and females.Programmes at ICDDR,B????????ChildHealth ReproductiveHealth HealthSystems InfectiousDiseasesandVaccineSciences HIV/AIDS Nutrition Popula.UscriptIn conclusion, HLA matching except when there is zero HLA-A, -B, and -DR incompatibility has had even less influence on short or long term primary cadaver kidney survival in African-Americans than the minimal effect in the non-African-American population.
J HEALTH POPUL NUTR 2008 Sep;26(3):251-252 ISSN 1606-0997 | 5.00+0.�INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR DIARRHOEAL DISEASE RESEARCH, BANGLADESHEDITORIALAchieving the Millennium Development Goals in BangladeshIn early 2006, scientists at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) proposed to the Office of the Population, Health, and Nutrition at the USAID Mission in Dhaka a review of some major health issues of Bangladesh–at least those in which ICDDR,B has expertise. The aim of this review was to identify selected key issues, try to understand the trends over the last one to two decade(s), and to interpret these trends in the light of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It was hoped these trends would show that Bangladesh was on target to meet these goals, or if it was not on a successful track, to suggest reasonable strategies to improve the trends. Obviously, there are many important health issues outside the scope of the ICDDR,B’s expertise, e.g. diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and many others. These are critical issues for the country, but these have not been identified as MDG targets, nor are these within the expertise of ICDDR,B; these are not, thus, included in this volume, although these may be extremely important for the overall provision of healthcare in the country. ICDDR,B is organized into thematic programmes as shown in the box. The members of each programme have discussed the challenge of identifying the key issues in their thematic area and have provided the information for each of the papers in this report. Some papers submitted to me were too detailed and had to be condensed to reduce their size. However, I have attempted to include the essence of the thinking of the groups. In each case, a writing team has contributed to the paper, and a smaller group has actually drafted the version submitted.Correspondence and reprint requests should be addressed to: Dr. David A. Sack Professor, Department of International Health Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 615NorthWolfeStreet/E5036 Baltimore, Maryland 21205 USA Email:[email protected] Fax:1-410-502-For each of the identified issues, there were two cross-cutting and inter-related themes in the background of the discussion. These may not always be stated explicitly in the text, but these clearly form an underlying concept for all our research and evaluation at the Centre. These are issues of equity and gender. It is not fair that basic health services would be available to some groups and not others. It is not fair that girls have higher degrees of malnutrition than boys, that women receive treatment for serious chronic conditions later than men, or that women proceed through pregnancy and delivery without the services needed to protect their health and their life. These equity and gender concerns partly relate to society and cultural practices, but they also relate to the health system itself. Regardless of the source of the inequity or bias, the health system must understand them and adjust to meet the needs of the vulnerable groups and females.Programmes at ICDDR,B????????ChildHealth ReproductiveHealth HealthSystems InfectiousDiseasesandVaccineSciences HIV/AIDS Nutrition Popula.