Mon. Jul 15th, 2024

Om the Medical Research Council. This work was also funded PubMed ID:http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/156/3/591 by a programme grant from Cancer Analysis UK (CA) (Alan Ashworth) and annual grants from Breakthrough Breast Cancer (BC, BC (Alan Ashworth) and CTRQYY (Clare Isacke)).CONFLICT OF INTERESTProfessor Ashworth and Dr Lord are coinvestigators on patents held with KudosAstra Zeneca for the improvement of PARP inhibitors and might also benefit through the Institute of Cancer Analysis `Rewards to Inventors’ scheme. Professor Ashworth, Dr Lord, and Dr Martin possess a patent pending on the use of methotrexate in mismatch repairdeficient cancers. Professor Ashworth has received honoraria from Roche, Merck Serono, and Clovis Oncology, and is a member with the scientific advisory board of GSK. The remaining authors declare no conflict of interest.
Rosendal et al. BMC Family Practice, : biomedcentral.comDEBATEOpen AccessMultiple perspectives on symptom interpretation in main care researchMarianne Rosendal, Dorte Ejg Jarb, Anette Fischer Pedersen and Rikke Sand AndersebstractBackground: Assessment and magement of symptoms is actually a primary process in primary care. Symptoms may be defined as `any subjective proof of a health dilemma as perceived by the patient’. In other words, symptoms usually do not seem as such; symptoms are rather the result of an interpretation approach. We aim to talk about distinctive perspectives on symptom interpretation as presented in the disciplines of biomedicine, psychology and anthropology and the probable implications for our understanding of study on symptoms in relation to prevalence and diagnosis inside the common population and in main care. Discussion: Symptom experiences are embedded within a complicated interplay in between biological, psychological and cultural things. From a biomedical point of view, symptoms are seen as possible indicators of illness and are characterized by parameters related to seriousness (e.g. look, severity, influence and temporal aspects). Nevertheless, such symptom traits are rarely umbiguous, but merely indicate disease probability. In addition, the GP’s interpretation of presenting symptoms will also be influenced by other components. From a psychological perspective, components affecting interpretation are in focus (e.g. FT011 interl frame of reference, consideration to sensations, illness perception and AZD3839 (free base) susceptibility to suggestion). These individual things can’t stand alone either, but are influenced by the surroundings. Anthropological research suggests that persol experiences and culture form a continuous feedback partnership which influence when and how sensations are understood as symptoms of disease and acted upon. Summary: The diverse approaches to symptom interpretation imply that we must be cautious and conscious when interpreting survey findings that are based on symptom prevalence within the common population or in key care. These findings will reflect several different interpretations of sensations, which are not equivalent to expressions of underlying disease. Furthermore, if diagnosis of disease is primarily based exclusively around the presence of certain symptom characteristics, we may risk reinforcing a dualistic approach, including medicalisation of standard phenome and devaluation of medically unexplained symptoms. Future investigation in primary care could obtain from exploring symptoms as a generic phenomenon and raised awareness of symptom complexity. Keyword phrases: Symptom investigation, Signs and symptoms, Symptom assessment, Interdiscipliry studies, General practice, M.Om the Medical Analysis Council. This operate was also funded PubMed ID:http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/156/3/591 by a programme grant from Cancer Investigation UK (CA) (Alan Ashworth) and annual grants from Breakthrough Breast Cancer (BC, BC (Alan Ashworth) and CTRQYY (Clare Isacke)).CONFLICT OF INTERESTProfessor Ashworth and Dr Lord are coinvestigators on patents held with KudosAstra Zeneca for the development of PARP inhibitors and might also benefit by way of the Institute of Cancer Analysis `Rewards to Inventors’ scheme. Professor Ashworth, Dr Lord, and Dr Martin have a patent pending on the use of methotrexate in mismatch repairdeficient cancers. Professor Ashworth has received honoraria from Roche, Merck Serono, and Clovis Oncology, and is a member from the scientific advisory board of GSK. The remaining authors declare no conflict of interest.
Rosendal et al. BMC Loved ones Practice, : biomedcentral.comDEBATEOpen AccessMultiple perspectives on symptom interpretation in principal care researchMarianne Rosendal, Dorte Ejg Jarb, Anette Fischer Pedersen and Rikke Sand AndersebstractBackground: Assessment and magement of symptoms can be a main task in primary care. Symptoms may be defined as `any subjective evidence of a overall health challenge as perceived by the patient’. In other words, symptoms usually do not appear as such; symptoms are rather the outcome of an interpretation approach. We aim to go over different perspectives on symptom interpretation as presented in the disciplines of biomedicine, psychology and anthropology plus the achievable implications for our understanding of investigation on symptoms in relation to prevalence and diagnosis within the general population and in primary care. Discussion: Symptom experiences are embedded within a complex interplay between biological, psychological and cultural things. From a biomedical perspective, symptoms are noticed as possible indicators of disease and are characterized by parameters connected to seriousness (e.g. look, severity, impact and temporal elements). On the other hand, such symptom characteristics are hardly ever umbiguous, but merely indicate disease probability. Moreover, the GP’s interpretation of presenting symptoms may also be influenced by other aspects. From a psychological perspective, factors affecting interpretation are in concentrate (e.g. interl frame of reference, interest to sensations, illness perception and susceptibility to suggestion). These individual components cannot stand alone either, but are influenced by the surroundings. Anthropological analysis suggests that persol experiences and culture kind a continuous feedback partnership which influence when and how sensations are understood as symptoms of illness and acted upon. Summary: The distinctive approaches to symptom interpretation imply that we need to be cautious and conscious when interpreting survey findings which can be primarily based on symptom prevalence inside the basic population or in key care. These findings will reflect many different interpretations of sensations, that are not equivalent to expressions of underlying disease. In addition, if diagnosis of illness is primarily based exclusively around the presence of specific symptom traits, we could risk reinforcing a dualistic method, including medicalisation of standard phenome and devaluation of medically unexplained symptoms. Future research in principal care could get from exploring symptoms as a generic phenomenon and raised awareness of symptom complexity. Keyword phrases: Symptom study, Signs and symptoms, Symptom assessment, Interdiscipliry studies, General practice, M.