Ance of these training programs, which could be designed to help

Ance of these training programs, which could be designed to help more effectively and ethically facilitate the use of new technologies. When done effectively and ethically, training programs could help chip away at some of the obstacles and stigmas that impede or discourage older adults from using resources that can greatly benefit them (such as tablets; for example in social connectivity, information seeking, and health management, see Author, 2015). This would not only create better training programs and potentially mitigate some ageist attitudes held by trainers (Author, 2013) but can also contribute to the overall well-being of the target population. For example, Levy et al. (2002) illustrated how among people 50 years and older, those with more positive internalized perceptions of aging lived an average of 7.6 years longer than those with more negative age stereotypes. This demonstrates the need for programs that address the competence and skills acquisition level but perhaps more importantly, programs that address the relational level as well. Thus, a more complete picture of ageism in technology adoption should be further explored and explicated in future research. Finally, this result suggests that even though technologies related to tablet use have evolved, the resources that would help individuals who are less technologically literate to use tablets (or any new technology) are greatly lacking. As mentioned above, some of the users haveAuthor Mangafodipir (trisodium) web Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptComput Human Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 September 01.Magsamen-Conrad et al.Pagerelatively high levels of anxiety or difficulty when they are introduced to new technologies. Such concerns related to the issue of the digital divide and ageism stress the need for lowering elders’ level of expected efforts for using new technology. Because the use of technology has transformed the workforce, educational practices, leisure activities, and specifically health services, technology training programs, and overall improved technology literacy, may help ease older individuals’ daily living (Alvseike Br nick, 2012; Volkom et al., 2013).Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript5. Limitations and Future DirectionsThere were certain limitations of the study and they should be recognized in order to make the findings more objective. The study is cross sectional and not longitudinal. Future research should consider a longitudinal design that would take into consideration any Lixisenatide site changes in the target population of the study. Another limitation is the sampling method used in the study, as network quota sampling is not generalizable. Therefore, future research should seek a random sample of participants. Researchers must be careful not to make assumptions about age differences in technology use that would drive selection of sampling variables. A better study might examine actual physical tablet use. For example, researchers might find a technology relevant but unfamiliar to a sample population of interest, pretest intentions of the sample then administer rudimentary training and disseminate the technology, then test again. Some of the individuals sampled in our study reported exceptionally high weekly hours of tablet use (i.e., 100?65 hours per week, nearly constantly). Although this type of use is conceivable with handheld devices, for example if individuals are using them to track sleep, it may.Ance of these training programs, which could be designed to help more effectively and ethically facilitate the use of new technologies. When done effectively and ethically, training programs could help chip away at some of the obstacles and stigmas that impede or discourage older adults from using resources that can greatly benefit them (such as tablets; for example in social connectivity, information seeking, and health management, see Author, 2015). This would not only create better training programs and potentially mitigate some ageist attitudes held by trainers (Author, 2013) but can also contribute to the overall well-being of the target population. For example, Levy et al. (2002) illustrated how among people 50 years and older, those with more positive internalized perceptions of aging lived an average of 7.6 years longer than those with more negative age stereotypes. This demonstrates the need for programs that address the competence and skills acquisition level but perhaps more importantly, programs that address the relational level as well. Thus, a more complete picture of ageism in technology adoption should be further explored and explicated in future research. Finally, this result suggests that even though technologies related to tablet use have evolved, the resources that would help individuals who are less technologically literate to use tablets (or any new technology) are greatly lacking. As mentioned above, some of the users haveAuthor Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author ManuscriptComput Human Behav. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2016 September 01.Magsamen-Conrad et al.Pagerelatively high levels of anxiety or difficulty when they are introduced to new technologies. Such concerns related to the issue of the digital divide and ageism stress the need for lowering elders’ level of expected efforts for using new technology. Because the use of technology has transformed the workforce, educational practices, leisure activities, and specifically health services, technology training programs, and overall improved technology literacy, may help ease older individuals’ daily living (Alvseike Br nick, 2012; Volkom et al., 2013).Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript Author Manuscript5. Limitations and Future DirectionsThere were certain limitations of the study and they should be recognized in order to make the findings more objective. The study is cross sectional and not longitudinal. Future research should consider a longitudinal design that would take into consideration any changes in the target population of the study. Another limitation is the sampling method used in the study, as network quota sampling is not generalizable. Therefore, future research should seek a random sample of participants. Researchers must be careful not to make assumptions about age differences in technology use that would drive selection of sampling variables. A better study might examine actual physical tablet use. For example, researchers might find a technology relevant but unfamiliar to a sample population of interest, pretest intentions of the sample then administer rudimentary training and disseminate the technology, then test again. Some of the individuals sampled in our study reported exceptionally high weekly hours of tablet use (i.e., 100?65 hours per week, nearly constantly). Although this type of use is conceivable with handheld devices, for example if individuals are using them to track sleep, it may.

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